The Seward Phoenix Log - News of the Eastern Kenai Peninsula since 1966

 
 

Turn back the pages — May 6, 1976

 


Compiled by Julie Rosier

Council vote rebid on R-21 Lots — Council members concurred with City Manager James Filip’s recommendation to rebid nine unsold R-21 Urban Renewal lots at the special meeting of the city council on Monday, May 3. Councilman Robert Mott made the motion for rebid which was seconded by James Dague. During discussion, Frank Dieckgraeff told fellow council members that local builder Don Ennis had called him while en route to Seward through Canada to say that he had understood that lots bought at the first R-21 Urban Renewal Sale were to be paid in full in 30 days. Ennis added he believed the contract specifically stated a 30 day pay off and if that contract was not adhered to he (Ennis) would hire an attorney. John Gillespie remarked that attorneys did not scare him if he knew he was right. Dieckgraeff stated that the attorney sat right at the administrators’ table and said there was to be a 30-day contract payoff. The city manager said the council’s memo on rebid would be sufficient to protect the municipality. When asked by Dieckgraeff if the lots had been advertised with the payment in full situation — Filip replied in the affirmative.

This week in city hall — One of the heaviest months for municipal business this year may well be May. At press time this week the City Council has held one special meeting and the Harbor Commission has also had a session. Every Monday and Wednesday is scheduled through the balance of the month. The Council approved the 1.2 million dollar bond issue ordinance on first reading Monday. It will be back on May 10 and 17 for fish products not processed within the city limits and elected a chairman. Adding to the flow of work is the budget and following each meeting will be budget work sessions between the administrators and the City Council. The spending plan becomes increasingly important in terms of ability to do work within acceptable limits of time and expense. Our budget is labor intensive, that is we spend much more for wages and salaries than we do for hardware items such as trucks or typewriters. The increasing cost of labor is one of the biggest reasons for an expanded budget amount but one which still preserves the rate of levy at 20 mills or 2 percent of assessed valuation. One of the topics of the meetings could be described as searching for revenue but equally important would be any contribution which would reduce or eliminate an expenditure. Money which is not required, money which is perhaps allowed to stay with the taxpayer instead.

Medical funding possible — Ten Alaskan hospitals would receive increased funding for medical contract care, if an addition requested by Senator Ted Stevens is included in the Fiscal Year 1976 second supplemental appropriations bill. Stevens has told the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee that $4.68 million is needed nationwide to meet the escalating costs of inpatient medical treatment. Included in the hospitals who could receive these added funds are Seward General and Central Peninsula in Soldotna. When contract care funds run out, patients must be flown to the nearest Indian Health Service hospital for treatment. Stevens said this presents a dangerous situation for those needing immediate treatment and that the funds are essential to providing adequate hospital care. “We can’t tolerate a situation where patients can’t receive the treatment they need because of inflationary costs over which they have no control. In Alaska, the IHS hospitals are often much further away than the local hospitals, increasing the hardship on those who must be taken there,” he said.

Beautiful downtown Moose Pass — The Nenana Ice Classic is over, the ice moved downriver to signal the end of winter at 10:51 a.m. on the 2nd of May. At the Crown Point Trading Post the grand winners of a $1 Minute Pool and $5 Minute Pool are: Irv Campbell (who makes those beautiful knives for his Tourist Trap) $60 in the $1 Pool and Jack Ballock of Summit Lake Lodge $110 in the $5 Pool. Pretty good cash for a good guess. Star says the Trading Post will be open summer hours now (sigh) 7 days a week, from 7 a.m. (Yawn) to 10 p.m. on weekdays and 11 p.m. on weekends, unless you can convince them to stay up later which isn’t that hard, which is what the yawn is all about, on occasion! Bill Hightower’s wife and daughter arrived on the Tustamena Friday when she docked in Seward, full too. They are busy building their home from the one Kaare Elde barely got started when Bill bought it. They are a welcome addition to Moose Pass and I’m sure they will be glad when they can live out here too. The Wolfe family is home after a four week vacation outside. Matthew went with them for most of the vacation but had to be home early to go back to work. Erik Jacobson went to visit with his grandparents while the rest of the family visited the northwest. They arrived in Anchorage on Sunday and caught the bus home on Monday. Glad to have them home.

Painter named Homemaker of the Year — About 75 Homemakers attended the spring meeting of the Kenai Extension Homemakers Council at Homer on Saturday, April 24. Mona Painter, Cooper Landing, was selected Council Homemaker of the year, and presented with a corsage. Mona will now be considered for the state award. Homemakers from various clubs presented demonstrations of historical crafts and skills: macrame, quilting, churning butter, grinding and using whole wheat, and soap making. The Homer Sweet Adelines gave a program of appropriate songs. Beth Kelsey gave a demonstration of hand spinning on her antique spinning wheel and displayed items which she had made from the hand spun yarn. Craft and needlework projects done by Homemakers were on display. The Ninilchik club exhibited a handmade rug of original bicentennial design; the Dall Homemakers of Cooper Landing, a quilt sewn entirely by hand; and the Sterling Homemakers had an outstanding display of antiques.

 

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